The Finkelstein Files: State of the HEART

Vanessa Steinberg always adored Joan Rivers. She was her idol. She was a distant relative. All Jews are. Joan Rivers inspired Vanessa to perform standup after she saw her perform in Melbourne in the mid-late 80’s.

During that tour her friend saw Joan Rivers coming out of “The Deli” in Toorak Rd in Melbourne. As you do. Vanessa’s friend went up to her and said “Can I get your autograph for my friend Vanessa who loves you dearly?”

Ever since, the autograph has served as a talisman for Vanessa Steinberg. She has prayed on it, asked it for advice, and kept it as a shrine to Joan Rivers’ talent and her refusal to be undone.

The fact that Joan continued to perform after the suicide of her husband inspired Vanessa to pursue comedy and stay laughing – in the face of any and all adversity.

Vanessa has certainly faced adversity. A genetic heart condition means that she is undergoing surgery only a week before her show “Not Quite White” opens as part of The Melbourne International Comedy Festival.



“I will be lying on my back for a week” says Vanessa. “I will continue to rehearse, imagining the ceiling is the audience”.

How Kahlo-esque; remember the Mexican-born artist who spent much of her life encased in a body brace, bed-bound, her creative energies barely bruised? Her art related her pain, anguish and anger at her living entombment. Like countless super women before, Frida Kahlo created sardonic, self-portraits all stamped with wit, dressed up as irony.

Fast forward a continent and generation away: strong, determined and whippet smart, all aptly describe Steinberg’s razor-sharp humour.

Dripping with modern-day societal dilemmas & directives of how she journey’s the rocky terrain of surviving as a 50-something single, this Jewish mother to two, daughter, sister, friend and lover of life lays it out like a corpse on a slab for dissection.

Unashamedly neurotic & narcissistic, Steinberg’s pincer-like observations leave your stomach muscles unexpaliedlt acheing for more, and your heart full of love for her embracement of life.

2019’s MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL COMEDY FESTIVAL applauds Steinberg’s return to the stage after a self-imposed decade-long hiatus; a talent segregated from her documentary film-making.

Today, not an hour ago she received a call to say she is one of a handful of comedian performing in the upcoming much loved festival to be short-listed for a Golden Gibbo Award; the proof is obviously is in this pudding.


Comedy Industry Veteran Andrew Maj is directing Vanessa’s show; “Vanessa Steinberg is a dynamic performer with great comedy material. She is fresh and funny, and we have worked together to create a solid hour of quality standup. If you’re easily offended…please come along and be offended some more!”


Not Quite White  is on from 4-17th April, 8.15pm at @ the Loop Bar, 23 Meyers Place, Melbourne.

BOOK HERE


Call 0404.861.438 for group bookings.

Images & words courtesy of The Finkelstein Files.

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The Finkelstein Files: Beyond The Woods

If trees are carriers of symbolic possibilities, the exhibition Beyond the Trees is a powerful and poetic response to our emotive connections to our planet. Climate change, the environment and the preservation of diversity are ‘hot’ topics. The life sustaining essence of trees is explored deftly by Victor Majzner who eschews these living monuments ideals of endurance and longevity. Often emblematic of patience and wisdom, dozens of canvases stand like proud sentinels along the gallery walls of the light-drenched Langford 120 in North Melbourne.

vic-Looking into myself, after Felix N 2013 Acrylic on canvas 92 x 92 cm

Beyond the Woods sign-posts a sharp twist in the tale of this image-maker of ideas of the Divine. An innate colourist, Majzner’s narratives intrigue and are full of pathos. Screams at the world mingle with recurring  faces reiterating a human helplessness –  a search for salvation? Many questions are raised without resolution as the trees sit expectantly, quietly on the walls – contemplating and confronting. Looking Into Myself, after Felix N, 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 92 x 92 cm (above).

vic-Portal to memory, after Ezra K 2013 Acrylic on canvas 92 x 92 cm

Portal to Memory, After Ezra K, 2013, 92 x 92cm (above), reflects two strong entertwined trees in a puddle of water – brothers who are emotionally connected or lovers? The connection is powerful and strong, a reflection as a symbolic portal to a memory from the past. A thought bubble hovers offering comfort, that these two souls are still looking after each other.

Vic-2 Vic-1

Much of Majzners’ writings on his work are encapsulated in an insanely beautiful box-set featuring a complete catalogue of works and an additional visual diary filled with studio insights and authored offerings on his mid-career trajectory. Designed by the artist’s equally talented son, Andrew of Paper, Stone, Scissors fame, its clear the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree!

vic-Strange fruit 2013 Acrylic on canvas 92 x 92 cm

The above image lends its’ title from one of the most moving of Billie Holiday’s songs, Strange Fruit.  The gigantic tree, a universe of life has from time to time become the conduit for violence, racism and death. Sanctified by manmade laws and attitudes of power where the humanity of ‘the other’ has been degraded to a possession, only to be disposed of at the racist whim of the plantation master of the KKK gang in the American South up to the 60’s.

vic-Sky_night tree, after Alex S 2012 Acrylic on canvas 152 x 137 cm

Victor explains that Alex Skovron’s poem The Sky Tree was the starting inspiration for this painting, “Memories of fairy tales from my childhood, of dark forests where miraculous adventures took place were other inspirational sources. Out of darkness /’nothing’/chaos energy swarms into a vortex that eventually forms into branches of a tree, like lightening rods of light coming down to ‘earth’ with lights at each braces’ extremity, illuminating / suggesting a spiritual dimension as its source. Through the branches, at night can be seen small villages with their distinguished church spires. These villages are separated by dark forests and by meandering country roads and lanes illuminated by ‘golden’ lights – magic pervades.”

vic-st-4

The roots of tradition and story-telling are embedded firmly into Majzner’s earth and the longer you spend gazing around the collection, the tighter the grip becomes. As he shows me around ‘the cage’ studio (above) – two days after a first viewing, these images resonate still, in my minds’ eye. Each with a story to tell and a potential lesson to unfurl.

The Finkelstein Files: Art Appreciation 101

Why does art matter?? For without perspective, life would be awfully dull!  It is our most expressive form of sharing. Art matters because it illustrates the human experience—the wonder of it, the bewilderment of it, the whimsy of it, and so much more. We would not be connected so deeply without the existence of art

The arts matter because they help us see the world from different perspectives. They give us empathy and help us understand people, places, periods of history, and issues with which we may otherwise be unfamiliar. They comfort us in grief and energise us in celebration. They are important because they can act as a catalyst for change…they can start a revolution! The arts ignite something in our brains that I can’t explain, but I know it’s essential for life.


Above: Artwork by painter Michael Whitehead, Document, 2018, Mixed Media on Linen, 150 x 200cm. Interior styling courtesy of Melissa Gries of Zenza Interiors.

Are you a newbie to the art of collecting? Here is a substantial reason how you can start your very own art collection! Post October this year, if you have a registered ABN for a business which is turning over under $10million annually, an art work upto $20,000 will be fully tax deductible under current ATO regulations.

So effectively, you could purchase 5 x paintings at $20,000 each & have something to show for $100,000 taxable amount owing. No better time to invest in an art collection! Read more HERE by arts accountant specialist & valuer, Michael Fox regarding the recent ATO updates.

Above: Artwork by painter Michael Whitehead, Manuscript, 2018, Mixed Media on Linen, 180 x 210cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by painter Michael Whitehead, H, 2018, Mixed Media on Linen, 180 x 210cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com


Above: Artwork by Patricia Heaslip, Walk In Silence, Oil on Canvas, 122 x 122cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

 

Above: Artwork by Thierry B., Nuanced, 2018 – Dreamscape series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 122 x 183cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com


Above: Artwork by Thierry B., Fairytale, 2018 Dreamscape Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

 

Above: Artwork by Wilson LinThe Things We Do For Love, Fractal Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 183 x 274.5cm (triptych). Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Wilson LinFresh Strike, 2018, Fractal Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 170 x 250cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

 

Above: Artwork by Thierry B., Mindful Moments, 2018 Dreamscape Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

 

Above: Artwork by Patricia Heaslip, Landlines, Oil on Linen, 183 X 183cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com


Above: Artwork by Thierry B., Entanglement, 2018 Coral Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

 

Above: Artwork by Thierry B.,Voyage, 2018,Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Thierry B.,The Deep Blue, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Thierry B.Starling Zen-sation, 2016,Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

If you have a registered ABN for a business which is turning over under $10million annually, an art work upto $20,000 will be fully tax deductible under current ATO regulations. So effectively, you could purchase 5 x paintings at $20,000 each & have something to show for $100,000 taxable amount owing. No better time to invest in an art collection! Read more HERE by arts accountant specialist & valuer, Michael Fox regarding the recent ATO updates.

The Thierry B Fine Art website offers a complete stockroom to view available works, interior pages with the paintings installed into their new homes for inspiration, in addition to a testimonial page which sounds positively smarmy – every word is true!!! We look forward to welcoming you into our bespoke gallery space, complete with oversize stockroom for your viewing pleasure.

Thierry B Fine Art  is located @ 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra. Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday 11am – 5pm & Sunday 12pm – 5pm or by appointment via art@thierrybfineart.com

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The Finkelstein Files: Y-ello? Is it Me You’re Looking For??

Finally the layers come off, our winter coats are swapped for lighter moments of turning our faces toward the sun again and soaking up all that luminous sunshine, blue skies, chirping birdies and the scent of flowers and bees busily humming. Not a moment too soon either, as Melbournians, we are well within our right to celebrate the joy that spring brings when it has indeed sprung!!

So too, new arrivals of sparkling and just-dried varnished art works jostle for position in our 500+ strong painting filled bespoke stock room. Wilson Lin has delivered a new fractal series, as has Phonsay, with some knock-your-socks-off hyper-realist paintings. Master painter, Thierry B. has been installing freshly framed creations onto the gallery walls for art collectors to snap up for their spaces at home or surround themselves with inspiring paintings whilst at work.



Above: Wilson Lin, The Things We Do For Love, Fractal Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 274.5cm, P.O.A


Above: Wilson Lin, Fresh Strike, Fractal series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 170 x 250cm, P.O.A


Above: Artist, Wilson Lin painting in his studio in Melbourne, 2018.


Above: Thierry B., Voyage, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, P.O.A

 

Above: Thierry B., The Deep Blue, Coral Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A

 

Above: Abstract Expressionist artist Thierry B., pictured in his gallery with painting, Zensation, 2017, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A

 

How many Abstract painters can confidently say, their oeuvre encompasses twenty-seven (27!!) different styles available to his clientele?! So much of Thierry B’s art can be traced and talked about in terms of intention. The use of repetition in mark making, draws the viewer into the picture plane. It can be seen as metaphor for making his mark upon the world on a physical scale. Lyrical and delicate imagery, these fluid shapes transform spaces they inhabit. Hypnotic and healing, many of  Thierry B’s series have been widely collected and photographed in private collections across Australia and overseas.

 

Above: Thierry B Fine Art represents some of Australia’s best-loved Abstract artists as they explore and celebrate colour, layers of texture texture & movement.

 

Above: Thierry B., A Fine Romance, Dreamscape Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

 

Above: Thierry B., Tenderness, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

 

Above: Thierry B., La Vie En Rose, Euphoria Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

 

Thierry B explains the art of zen; “My work is all about introducing the joy of colour into our lives, often seen here through cross-sections which challenge your spatial perception. The vibrancy of hue and curvilinear forms in repetition create a dynamic feast for the eye, where they are in constant motion. Energy maps a pathway for our eyes and hearts to meld.” – Thierry B, July 2018.

 

Above: Hyper-realism artist, Phonsay painting in his Albury-based studio.

 

Above: Phonsay, Desert Storm, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 91.5 x 122cm, P.O.A. Framed in 18 carat white-gold water-gilding with ornate white custom-made frame.

 

If you have a registered ABN for a business which is turning over under $10million annually, an art work upto $20,000 will be fully tax deductible under current ATO regulations.

The Thierry B Fine Art website offers a complete stockroom to view available works, interior pages with the paintings installed into their new homes for inspiration, in addition to a testimonial page which sounds positively smarmy – every word is true!!! We look forward to welcoming you into our bespoke gallery space, complete with oversize stockroom for your viewing pleasure.

The gallery is located @ 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra. Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday 11am – 5pm & Sunday 12pm – 5pm or by appointment.

The Finkelstein Files: The Art of Living Joyfully

Tolarno’s, a St.Kilda gastronomic institution for many decades of loyal customers gathered regularly to partake the bonhomie and Mirka Mora murals which festooned the walls with ducks, serpents, floral and doll-like motifs.

One of Australia’s best-loved artist, Mirka Mora has passed this week, aged 90, much to the distress of the visual art community. Her work has been revered, enjoyed and collected for as long as Mirka has been creating it. Mirka, one of Melbourne’s most famous bohemians, transformed the culture of her adopted home town since emigrating to Australia in the 1950s from war-torn France.

“Art is the child of the imagination and gives life”, Mirka famously uttered.

Throughout Mirka’s life, art was a constant. Her sensuous, cherubic figures — described by one 1960s art critic as ‘medieval imps’ — are instantly recognisable. Mirka created a prolific output of work spanning across six decades, with a range of media including drawing, painting, embroidery, soft sculpture, mosaics and doll-making.

 

Mirka Mora with her Soft Sculptures, August 29, 1979. Image Courtesy: Fairfax Media.

 

With more than 35 solo exhibitions throughout her career, including a retrospective at Heide Museum of Art in 1999-2000, celebrated 50 years of her work. Later this year in October, Heide will mark her 90th year with Mirka Mora: Pas de Deux – Drawings and Dolls, with its curators have written a book, Mirka and Georges, to coincide with the exhibition.

 

It seems nearly every Melbournite who has worked, lived and breathed amongst the artistic milieu has a Mirka tale to tell, each more arresting and controversially charming than the next. She was the pied-piper of the art tableuax, weaving her special brand of magic-like pixie-dust wherever she went. What a life worth living! Mirka seemed to leave a trail of art-lovers; charming them with her whacky yet wise stories of her colourful life, led with joy. Her joy was infectious, with people often referring to her child-like approach akin to madness – Mirka was perhaps the most sane of all.

 

Mirka’s studio wall, 2014, Tanner St, Richmond, Melbourne.

Widely respected art dealer, son William Mora explains the magic which was Mirka, “an artist and mentor who touched the lives of thousands, she has had an indelible effect on Australia’s cultural life. The joie de vivre she has shared with so many will continue in her immense legacy of art and her spirit of generosity.”

“Her colourful, sensuous iconography has emerged from the breadth of her interests and reading, her love of classical mythology, her desire to reclaim and make sense of childhood and familial relations, and her recognition of the power of sexual desire”.

 

Mirka Mora, Mother and Child, 1984, Gouache on paper, 18 x 13cm.

 

Carrillo Gantner AO, expresses his heart-felt memories in the forthcoming book Mirka Mora, A life of Making Art by Sabine Cotte, published by Thames and Hudson Australia and  due for release in 2019:

“Many years ago my wife and I were sitting with Mirka in the café at the Australian National Gallery in Canberra. I asked her to tell me the story of her miraculous escape at age 13 from the train heading to the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz. She started to relate how she wrote a note with the names of the stations she was passing on a scrap of paper addressed to her father in Paris and pushed it out through a crack in the cattle truck in which she was being transported. Someone picked it up and sent it on to her father who worked out where she was headed. He bribed the Nazi authorities and she was released at the gates of Auschwitz with the eyes of the inmates staring out at her through the barbed wire. Then in the midst of the café crowd, Mirka burst into wild, incongruous laughter.


Mirka Mora, Friends and Lovers, 2004, Oil on Canvas, 119.5 x 119.5cm.

 

“Those large round eyes staring out at her are there in so many of her paintings and other works. So is her laughter in the face of death and in her commitment to the outrageous and colourful miracle of life. You cannot help but fall in love with Mirka. Everyone who meets her or stands before her work feels the sense of joy and of life lived to the max. If Australia had National Living Treasures as they do in Japan, Mirka Mora would undoubtedly be one of ours”,

 

Mirka Mora, Medieval Gathering (1987-1992), Oil on Canvas, 122.0 × 214.0cm, Image courtesy: National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

 

“Mirka always said that my mother bought the very first painting she ever sold, and many others in the decades that followed. They remained the closest of friends and I grew up with regular injections of her art, her delicious French accent and delicious French cooking, her laughter and her occasional behavioural extremes. She always managed to put herself at the epicentre of attention, punching her fist into my 40th birthday cake, grabbing my hand and jumping into the swimming pool fully clothed at a polite Toorak party, turning a thank you speech at a Town Hall dinner in her honour into a dissertation on the delights of the clitoris, or hoisting her hospital gown to show me and her delighted hospital roommates her generous surgical scar and so much more. 

 

Mirka Mora, Together, 1996, Oil on Canvas, 50.5 x 61cm.

 

“For my mother, Mirka represented the freedom of the artist’s life that she wished she herself might have led were it not for family pressures and social convention. For my children, Mirka almost came from another world, bearing the pleasures of surprise and fantasy. She would draw some strange creature for them and inspire them to repay the favour with their own imaginative scribbles. They loved her. Absolutely everyone loved her, whether they were children or elderly students at her Adult Education classes who imagined once again that they just might be.”

 

 

“First and always foremost, Mirka was an artist. She loved to paint or build soft creatures or embroider pictures or set mosaics. Every day of her life she worked tirelessly at her art, always sketching or pulling out her watercolours or researching images in ancient art books, always with the intensity of someone who treasured life and valued time. Even as she grew old, she told me that she had to work at her easel for hours every day, summoning mythological angels, animals, birds and plants in vivid colours. And always there were those eyes.”

Mirka’s vivacious personality and her vitality pegged her as a creative who blurred the boundaries by speaking with spirited sense of humanity. Thank you Mirka – you will certainly always be remembered for your exuberance and for exemplifying the art of joyful living.

The Finkelstein Files: Moody Blues


Above: Visitor from Singapore to the gallery with Thierry B. over the weekend. New Coral Series painting installed entitled, The Deep Blue, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A

How many Abstract painters can confidently say, their oeuvre encompasses twenty-seven (27) different styles available to his clientele?! So much of Thierry B’s art can be traced and talked about in terms of intention. The use of repetition in mark making, draws the viewer into the picture plane. It can be seen as metaphor for making his mark upon the world on a physical scale. Lyrical and delicate imagery, these fluid shapes transform spaces they inhabit. Hypnotic and healing, many of  Thierry B’s series have been widely collected and photographed in private collections across Australia and overseas.


Above: Jane Valentine’s Shielding II, Carrara Statuario Marble on granite base, 110h x 110w x 31d cm, P.O.A

 

Jane VALENTINE developed a strong passion for marble during her time spent in the sculpting village of Pietrasanta, situated at the base of the Carrarra Mountains in Northern Italy. During her time there she explored a strong and individual style of art making. Valentine’s marble forms survey classical simplicity and the purity of form. Much like the later works of Romanian sculptor, Constantin Brancusi, her structures and vessels are abstracted and embrace various aspects of the natural world. Her aesthetic resonates with the essential elements of sculpture and its traditions to reveal the clarity of the material and its form. Artist Jane Valentine, working in her studio Nicola Stagetti, in Pietrasanta, Italy.

 

 

Valentine has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout Australia and in Italy. She has received several commissions for her work including three major Statuario marble works for Chadstone Shopping Centre in 2009. Valentine represented Australia at the 1999 International Sculpture Symposium in Changchun, China and her work is on permanent display at the Changchun International Sculpture Park. Her first major exhibition was representing Australia in the 1999 International Sculpture Symposium in Changchun, China.  More recently, her pair of Droplets, 2014, (pictured above) are now sited at The Gandel’s Pt.Leo Winery & Sculpture park on the Mornington peninsula, outside Melbourne, an hour out by car on the freeway.


Above: Above: Patricia Heaslip, Resolution, 2018, Oil on Board, 137 x 137cm. Private Residence: Port Melbourne, Australia.


Above: Patricia Heaslip, Undercurrent, 2018, Oil on Board, 137 x 137cm, P.O.A

Above: Patricia Heaslip, Happy Heart, 2016, Oil on Linen, 183 x 183cm. Private Residence: Malvern, Melbourne, Australia.

With art we travel. What leads us to search out meaning for the walls of our inner harbours and our exterior retreats? What combination of space, surface and colour lead us to a feeling of extended openness, of belonging to our surroundings, of expansion of space and the glimmer of inexplicable lightness.

As we travel through architectural spaces, designed places – the search for the spontaneous and the desirable, and at times the spiritual, can often be mirrored in how we choose to demarcate our ideologies of place.

 

Above: Thierry B, A Blue HeartDarwinism Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, P.O.A

 

Thierry B explains the art of zen; “My work is all about introducing the joy of colour into our lives, often seen here through cross-sections which challenge your spatial perception. The vibrancy of hue and curvilinear forms in repetition create a dynamic feast for the eye, where they are in constant motion. Energy maps a pathway for our eyes and hearts to meld.” – Thierry B, July 2015.

The Thierry B Fine Art website offers a complete stockroom to view available works, interior pages with the paintings installed into their new homes for inspiration, in addition to a testimonial page which sounds positively smarmy – every word is true!!! We look forward to welcoming you into our bespoke gallery space, complete with oversize stockroom for your viewing pleasure.

The gallery is located @ 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra. Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday 11am – 5pm & Sunday 12pm – 5pm or by appointment.

The Finkelstein Files: In My Room

“Mother says there are locked rooms inside all women; kitchen of lust, bedroom of grief, bathroom of apathy.”

– from ‘The House’ by Warsan Shire

In My Room is the telling title of Helen Gory’s newest body of works – at once an invitation and a provocation. Strongly symbolist in nature and style, she has created a blueprint that challenges the viewer to encroach on her personal space; both as audience and interrogator.

Gilt-laden images are scratched into the paper, challenging its singular appearance. I am reminded of Austrian-born artist Gustav Klimt, who once said something like ‘art is a line around your thoughts’. This idea resonates throughout Gory’s works, which are at once deeply personal and universal. Draw a line; make a point; take a stand; risk something.

Gory’s oil-stick women delve backwards into unrevealed pockets of spaces, memories compartmentalised into separate ‘rooms’. Her challenge – and ours – is to slowly, carefully unpack these subtle chimeras; expose their interior to the outer world. Woman with Leaf speaks loudest without uttering a word. Verging on naïve, these night-shade women hover between darkness and illumination. Their talisman tools may well be props; striking a pose that both regales and invites us inside.

Helen Gory opened her own contemporary commercial art gallery in 1995. Helen Gory Galerie was a pioneer in supporting emerging practitioners, many of whom have gone on to become Australia’s leading visual artists. In 2008, Gory closed her gallery to pursue a long-unfulfilled desire to make art.

Golden Bars, 2018

Paper Collage and Oil Stick on Art Paper, 140 x 110cm.

It’s a Challenge, 2018

Paper Collage and Oil Stick on Art Paper, 140 x 110cm.

Walking Back To Happiness, 2018

Paper Collage and Oil Stick on Art Paper, 140 x 110cm.

Gory’s work is best described as visual stories where humour and joy sit side-by-side with the shadows that they cast. She is concerned with uncovering what is hidden, with the act of revelation. Through the repeated motifs of fragmented body parts, women, and elements of the natural world, her often-surreal images speak of desire, longing, angst and the power of transformation.

(det.) The Leaf, 2018, Oil Paint on Paper, 109 x 67cm

The Leaf, 2018

Oil Paint on Paper, 109 x 67cm

Gory works across various medium to construct these visual narratives. Her first primary medium, collage, allows her to deconstruct, fragment, (dis)connect and reassemble, the process of creation a metaphor for the complexity and layering of human experience.

More recently, Gory has segued from collage to painting and drawing. Using oil stick, graphite and charcoal in scribbling and scratching-like motions, she adds/removes layers in a repetitive act of mark-making that is intrinsic to the interior world she is revealing.

The Pods, 2018

Oil Paint on Paper, 109 x 67cm

(det.) The Pods, 2018

Oil Paint on Paper, 109 x 67cm

The Scarf, 2018

Oil Paint on Paper, 109 x 67cm

The Scarf, 2018

Oil Paint on Paper, 109 x 67cm

Last weekend to see In My Room!

Head to: Backwoods Gallery, 25 Easey Street, Collingwood, VIC, Australia (map)