The Finkelstein Files: The Winds of Change

I love it when the spring shifts ever so slightly into summery mode. If you are based in Melbourne, Australia – you may also have taken note & fished out your sandals last week when the mercury hit 31 degrees two days, back-to-back. Alas, as optimistic as even the most seasoned veteran of our blink-and -you’ll-miss- it weather down south, we are back to halcyon high-wind days filled with woeful hay fever and awful allergies fluttering through our day.

Summer, where are you?? Please hurry! We miss you and want you back!

Above: Thierry B, On The Rise, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 152cm, P.O.A.

Michelle Breton, Honey Dreaming, Mixed media on Canvas, 137 x 153cm, P.O.A


Above: Patricia Heaslip, Landlines, Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A

 

Above: Thierry B, Satisfaction, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, P.O.A.

Even As I thumb through my latest novel, Honey, Baby, Sweetheart by Deb Caletti, I am willing the weather toward sunshiney days/daze:

“Summer, after all, is a time when wonderful things can happen to quiet people. For those few months, you’re not required to be who everyone thinks you are, and that cut-grass smell in the air and the chance to dive into the deep end of a pool give you a courage you don’t have the rest of the year. You can be grateful and easy, with no eyes on you, and no past. Summer just opens the door and lets you out.”

Above: Thierry B, Submerged, Synthetic Polymer Paint On Linen 184 x 153 cm,  P.O.A

Above: Thierry B, Effervescence, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen,  122 x 168cm, P.O.A

Above: Michelle Breton Trompette au Soleil, Mixed Media on Canvas, 153 x 137cm, P.O.A

I also feel I need to tell you that I started the day by ordering at my local cafe Mr.Brightside a plate of summer! I couldn’t go past their special menu which had got a little summer make over today. This is Challah French Toast with raspberry mascarpone, fresh berries and maple. Never one to do things half-heartedly, I added a berry smoothy in for good measure! So delicious. Now all we need are some seriously good sunsets beachside , with some Frose or Negroni spritzers & we’re talking!!

Inspired by this sunset snap last week (above), I throw it out to the weather gods that be – summer where for art thou?!! If I cannot bask in the light of a shimmering summer day, than I will go in search of finding other ways to bring the energy inwards – paintings perform this function. They engage and enliven a previously empty space, lending it life and an anchor for your gaze. Take a closer look at the new offerings by Australian talent we have in the gallery stockroom now to view.

Above: Michelle Breton, Octobre a Ceret, Mixed Media on Canvas, 152 x 137cm, P.O.A

Patricia Heaslip, The Essences, Oil On Canvas, 152.5 x 106 cm, P.O.A.

Patricia Heaslip, Fortitude, Oil On Canvas, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A.

Above: Michelle Breton, Rising Candy, Mixed Media on Canvas, 183 x 152cm, P.O.A

As potential collector and client of Thierry B Fine Art, we are excited to offer Autralia-wide complimentary delivery to your home or business address. To place your order, email art@thierrybfineart.com or call directly on: +613 9827 7756. Thierry B Fine Art is located at 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra.

Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday, 11am – 5pm, Sunday 12pm-5pm or by appointment: 0404 861 438.

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Thierry B Fine Art: 13 Reasons Why Original Art In The Home Is As Important As A Bed


Above: Patricia Heaslip, Ether, Oil on Linen, 183 x 183cm, Private Residence, Malvern, Australia.

13 REASONS WHY ORIGINAL ART IN THE HOME IS AS IMPORTANT AS A BED

Having original art in the home is vital to your well being. Art is a key piece of furniture for many reasons and yet it is sometimes put on the back burner in comparison to other home objects. This list is dedicated to the understanding of importance of art from perspectives of interior design, well being, social atmosphere, creating a mood in the home, and more. One quote that stands out about the importance of original art is the following, “You would never put fake books on your bookshelf, so why would you put fake art on your walls?”

Above: Patricia Heaslip, Untitled, Oil on Linen, 183 x 183cm, Private Residence, Brighton, Australia.

1. Creates Mood 

Brain scans have revealed that looking at works of art trigger a surge of dopamine into the same area of the brain that registers desire, pleasure, and romantic love. Romantic, sublime landscapes provoke contemplation of nature and purity. Such works then create a mood of peace and are good for relaxation rooms such as the bedroom.

Above: Michael Whitehead, Ever After, Synthetic Polymer Paint & Mixed Media on Linen, 80 x 270cm, Private Residence, Toorak, Australia.

2. Adds Personal Character to the Home 

We all love to express ourselves, be it through clothing, accessories, social media – the list goes on! Original art in the home is a perfect way to express your artistic and aesthetic interests in a way different from most, for original artworks are one of a kind.

Above: (left) Phonsay, Under My Umbrella, (right) Bubble Gum Dream, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 122cm, Private Residence, South Yarra, Australia.

3. Makes Memories

Buying an original work of art is an experience. For whatever reason, you were drawn to a specific piece (or multiple). You may have seen it at a show opening, had a nice trip to the ice cream shop before hand. Whatever happened leading up to/during/after the purchase of a meaningful original work will be remembered every time you see it. This will not happen with a poster from Ikea.

Above: Thierry B, Darwinism Series, Triptych, Synthetic Polymer paint on Line,  183 x 152cm x 3 panels. Private Rseidence, Caulfield, Australia.

4. Provides a Colour Palette 

When rooms have a lot of colours, or many shades of the same colour, it can become overwhelming. An original work of art is a beautiful, meaningful way to tie everything together and create a general focal point.

Above: Thierry B, Next Chapter, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm, Private Collection, South Yarra, Australia.

5. Makes a Room Feel Finished 

When walls are empty, a room does not necessarily look bad, but by no means does it look finished. Rooms with empty walls are functional rooms in a house. Rooms with original art work are comfortable rooms in a home.

Above: Michelle Breton, Untitled, Mixed Media on Canvas, 152 x 152cm, Private Residence, Kooyong, Australia. Styling: Lisa Gole Interiors.

6. Inspires and Fosters Creativity 

This one is simple – in rooms with no art, artistic expression is lacking and therefore the need and want for creativity is not very prominent. On the opposite end of the spectrum, original artworks foster creativity, expression, artistic inspiration. This is particularly important in homes with children as being surrounded by artwork will allow creative thinking. This idea is expanded on in reason 11.

Above: Justin Audrins, Talking Heads, Oil on Canvas, 137.5 x 198cm. Private Residence, Toorak, Australia.

7. Conversation Starter 

As mentioned in reason 2, hanging original art in your home is a way of expressing oneself. That being said, guests will always be curious about the choice of artwork, the story, have questions about the artist, etc. It is a way to show off your art collection while having passionate conversations with house guests.

Above: Thierry B, Euphoria Series, Synthetic Polymer paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm. Private Residence, Melbourne, Australia. Styling: David Hicks Design.

8. Supports Artists 

One of the most important things about buying original artwork is that you are supporting an artist’s career. Each time you have a look at a work in your home, it provides a feel-good emotion that you are assisting an artist in achieving the success and recognition they deserve.

Above: Michael Whitehead, Things Forgotten, Synthetic Polymer Paint & Mixed Media on Canvas, 120 x 150cm.

9. It is an Investment 

Building off of reason 8, not only does owning original work in the home allow you to support artists’ careers, but it is also an investment. These artworks can be passed down through family and friends, be shared with loved ones for many years all while increasing in worth. This is never something that will be achieved with a $12 print from Kmart.

Above: Thierry B, Blush, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 122 x 91.5cm.

10. Creates a Livable Environment 

Art can make rooms that are not necessarily “home-y” become comfortable working and living environments. A home office, for example, can transform from a place of work and business to one of relaxation and productivity all the with addition of an original work of art. Attached is an article explaining how artwork in office spaces improves employee productivity.

 

Above: Thierry B, Unlimited, 183 x 183cm & Between the Lines Series, 122 x 91.5cm, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen. Private Residence, Albert Park, Australia.

11. Keeps the Brain Active 

Art is very conceptual, artists use it as a medium to express personal thought, political or social issues, and to make us as viewers think. Some people do quizzes or crossword puzzles to keep their brain active, but another way to do so is to own original artwork in the home, to just sit, look, and think.

Above: Michelle Breton, Collioure, Mixed Media on Canvas, 117.5 x 203cm. Private Collection, Caulfield Australia.

12. Relaxation 

In a busy, fast-paced world that demands speed and productivity, home should be a place of relaxation. Coming home from a busy day at work to sit on your couch and stare at a TV or a blank wall is not as recharging or relaxing as enjoying an artwork purchased with the means to create a positive mood.

Above: Thierry B, Pieces of You, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm. Private Residence, Toorak, Australia.

13. Curating Your Own Gallery is Fun! 

Last but certainly not least, curating a gallery is fun! Attending show openings, going to galleries, chatting with artists even, it is a fun experience! After a while you will start to notice a theme, in subject matter, colour, concept, etc. Playing with moods, composition, placement in the home, of all these reasons why to have art in the home, let’s not forget the fact that it is simply something fun to do.

As potential collector and client of Thierry B Fine Art, we are excited to offer Autralia-wide complimentary delivery to your home or business address. To place your order, email art@thierrybfineart.com or call directly on: +613 9827 7756. Thierry B Fine Art is located at 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra.

Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday, 11am – 5pm, Sunday 12pm-5pm or by appointment: 0404 861 438.

 

Thierry B Fine Art: What Makes Contemporary Aboriginal Art?

What Makes Contemporary Aboriginal Art ?

The contradiction of Aboriginal art is that it is both timeless and contemporary at the same time. This duality challenges the Western understanding of the progress of culture and ideas. Since Aboriginal culture is the oldest continuous living culture in the world , her artwork has existed for 40,000 years and is rooted in the human pre-history. Through songs, rituals, dances, storytelling, symbols and meaningful patterns that are being passed on, Aboriginal groups have managed to preserve their culture for thousands of years. When a group of elder desert men first started to paint their cultural heritage using paper and canvas, that was the birth of the movement that much influenced Aboriginal communities and Australian art in general. For the majority of Westerners, this was the first encounter with Aboriginal culture in general. Having a timeless connection to the pre-history and the first inhabitants of the Australian landscape, Aboriginal art has also been perceived as an innovative and iconic art form inherent to Australia.

Gloria Petyarre, Bush Medicine Leaves, Acrylic on Linen, 204 x 139 cm.

The Origins of Aboriginal Contemporary Art

The first desert works emerged in Papunya in 1971. A white Australian teacher and art worker Geffrey Bardon who was working in a remote community in Central Australia started an art program with children and elder men in the village. When elder men started to translate their knowledge of traditional folklore onto canvas, this was the birth of the contemporary art movement. Soon after, eleven men have formed a cooperative called Papunya Tula Artists, and the movement started to generate a widespread interest across rural and remote Aboriginal Australia.  Over subsequent decade as many Aboriginal communities contributed with their specific culture and knowledge, these differences developed into different pictorial languages and regional styles emphisizing their diversity. These initial works that include pieces by now famous Aboriginal artists such as Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri and Kaapa Tjampitjinpa, are today considered as the foundation of the contemporary Aboriginal art movement and are accounted as very valuable. The art critic and writer Robert Hughes has described the rise of contemporary Australian Aboriginal Art as ‘the latest great art movement of the twentieth century’.

Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri, Narripi Worm Dreaming, ADG:845, 1997, 125 x 96cm.

The Symbol As a Language

Since Aborigines didn’t have a history of writing, they have a long tradition of communicating their stories and heritage graphically through symbols. This ancient iconography has transferred into contemporary art works. Often reflecting the spiritual traditions, cultural practices and sociopolitical circumstances of indigenous people, stories and symbols vary widely among the diverse Aboriginal cultures. They range from ones derived from the hunting and tracking background portraying animals and humans with marks they leave or certain clan patterns to aspects of their ‘Dreaming’. The Dreamtime is a translation of the Creation time for Aboriginal people, and it provides their identity and the connection to the land. Artists often need a permission to paint certain traditional stories, and this right is inherited.

Sally Gabori, DulkaWarngiid, 2007, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 195 x 610cm. Collection: National Gallery of Victoria.

The Aboriginal Art Today

Contemporary indigenous artists have won many of Australia’s most prominent art prizes not only reserved for indigenous art. Also, Aboriginal artists have represented Australia in the Venice Biennale in 1990 and 1997. Today, Aboriginal art is internationally acclaimed and recognized as fine art. It ranges across a wide variety of mediums from works on paper and canvas to fiber, glass and printmaking. Rooted in traditional iconography, the works are often remarkably modern in design and color. Some of the most prominent names include Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri, Kaapa Tjampitjinpa,Emily Kngwarreye, Lorna Napurrula Fencer, Christine Napanangka Michaels, Rover Thomas and Gloria Petyarre. There has been a number of Aboriginal artists, such as Michael CookWilliam King Jungala or his daughter Sarrita King who have developed a very unique contemporary style combining their Aboriginal heritage with practices and techniques closer to the Western contemporary art. Albert Namatjira, one of the pioneers of Contemporary Aboriginal art, produced western style landscapes different to the traditional Aboriginal art style. On the other hand, there is a number of artists who ethnically and culturally identify as indigenous, but have adopted global art practices and recognizably Western style. Labeling them as Aboriginal artists have caused political controversies and raised questions on conventional notions of what Aboriginal art is.

Sarrita King, Ancestors, Jap 010912, Acrylic on Linen, 90 x 60 cm.

Sarrita King, Water, Jap-008727, Acrylic on Linen, 230 x 140 cm.

Labels and Controversies

It has been widely discussed whether the indigenous art has been commodified by the West and the commercial art world. It has been even suggested that using terms as ‘Aboriginal art’ is intrinsically racist in terms of labeling Aboriginality as ‘other’ compared to the Western norm.  Many contemporary artists who happen to be of Aboriginal descent refuse to be categorized and labeled simply for their ethnicity. This issue has gained great publicity when in 1990s Australia’s most renowned international artist Tracey Moffatt refused to present at the exhibition exclusively Aboriginal, and more recently when acclaimed contemporary artist Richard Bell was awarded the National Aboriginal & Torre Strait Islander Art Award in 2003. It seems that it might be the time that the Western community develops a more sophisticated understanding of the diversity of artists of indigenous descent.

Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Bush Yam Dreaming, 1994, inscribed verso: #551, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 183.0 x 122.0 cm.

Aboriginal Art in the Art Market

In 2007, the painting Earth’s Creation by Emily Kngwarreye became the first Aboriginal artwork sold for more than $ 1 million. Her use of dots reaches its crescendo in this phase, with dots merging, separating and dominating in various configurations. They fuse together to create planes of colour structured into mobile shapes, or are choreographed to form lines that suggest dance movements. In earlier works they are used to form fine veils that shield secret markings or create shimmering effects reminiscent of the cosmos. Emily’s palette was largely determined by the changing seasons. Dusty browns appear in her canvases during the dry season, and greens appear after the rains, which Emily referred to as ‘green time’. When wildflowers carpeted the desert, she used a spectrum of yellows. The visual intensity of these paintings recalls the work of French colourists Sonia and Robert Delaunay, or even Claude Monet. Yet Emily knew nothing of their work and, while these French modernists explored pure colour as form and subject, Emily’s only subject throughout her life was her ancestral home of Alhalkere. Emily’s “green-time” canvases attest to an unshakable connection between body and country, one that evades iconography yet demands to be felt.

Only a few months after, an epic work Warlugulong by Clifford Possum was sold for $ 2.4 million in Sotheby’s auction in Melbourne. After the initial boom, the market for these works started to struggle due to the issues with authenticity, ownership, exploitation and Australia’s cultural heritage regulation. On the other hand, the first ever sale of Aboriginal art at Sotheby’s London in June 2015 was a huge success showing a sign of renewed interest in this movement. When choosing a piece, the great importance should be placed on the style, medium, status of the artist and age of the artist. With five works being sold for over $100,000, the auction brought in over $ 2 million for 75 lots. As the price of the pieces is rising again, buying Aboriginal art could be a wise investment.

Thierry B Fine Art proudly offers Aboriginal art and may be viewed in our gallery stockroom. Gallery hours are: Monday – Saturday 11am – 5pm, Sunday 12pm – 5pm, or by appointment on : +613404861438.

Vicki xx

The Finkelstein Files: Art Matters

Above: Michelle Breton, Chant Du Midi, Mixed Media, 152 x 137cm.

 

Above: Thierry B, Blush, Synthetic polymer Paint on Canvas, 122 x 91.5cm.

 

Above Left: Thierry B, Where Are You Now?, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 170 x 250cm, Private Residence, Caulfield.

Above Right: Michael Whitehead, Things Forgotten, Synthetic Polymer Paint & Mixed Media on Canvas, 120 x 150cm, Private Residence, Caulfield.

 

The definition of decorative means to make something more attractive – to embellish and beautify and enhance one’s environment. In France, the term decorative is celebrated in all its forms from furniture, to carpets, soft furnishings and ornaments. Decoration is an art form in itself to be revered and admired. Why then, does the word ‘decorative’ sound so dirty when we apply it to art ?

To decorate one’s environment is to create a space which reflects your taste and admiration for certain colour palettes and styles which inform and transform wall space into ‘energy pockets’ where your eyes zoom in and rest on works you love to look at and live with everyday. And it is entirely personal. What we are drawn toward and respond to may be decorative in nature, have no narrative but to take your eyes on a journey of exploration.

Above: Patricia Heaslip, Ether, Oil on Linen, 183 x 183cm –  Private Residence, Malvern.

Above: Patricia Heaslip, Untitled, Oil on Linen, 183 x 183cm –  Private Residence, Brighton.

Above: Patricia Heaslip, Diamond Soul, Oil on Linen, 183 x 183cm.

Thierry B Fine Art offers our clients possibilities and services which no other gallery includes in Melbourne. If you are placing your greatest asset on the market for sale, our stockroom holds over 400 paintings by an eclectic range of 12 artists including the prolific portfolio by Thierry B himself, whose series number 16 different styles. Truly something for everyone – we are adept at working within your budget and timeframe — whether it be for an Open For Inspection to the public, or a private function hosted at home, or longer term rentals available for commercial and private spaces.

More cost effective than alternative options – our service provides delivery with our professional carriers and installation by Thierry B for the wow factor. Thierry has been told by so many satisfied clients that he ‘has the eye’ & will deftly tweak a few pieces of your existing furniture, or suggest some tired art works require a ‘facelift’ with a sharp custom frame, can source on your behalf furniture, soft furnishings where required.

“Thank you to Thierry B – he has ‘the eye’! With our renovation complete, we had many blank walls staring back at us but had no idea where to start. Thierry was able to assist us with proportions and existing work we owned and even the placement of furniture so that it all flowed beautifully from one room to the next” – Mr. & Mrs. Cawthorne, Brighton.

 

Above: Thierry B, Darwinism Series, Indulgence of Freedom, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 200 x 300cm.

Above: Thierry B, Darwinism Series,  Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 170 x 250cm – Private Residence, East Melbourne.

 

With as many as 16 painting styles, Thierry B has a healthy insta following  – all enamoured with his diversity and talent. He is open to accepting commissions for clients who are keen to add his energy to their blank walls at home. Thierry regularly makes house calls to offer a complimentary consultation to recommend the ideal proportions of a painting which can act as an anchor point in a room. Clients are then able to select their preferred colour palette to either work back with existing work hanging or create a new energy in the space.

 

Above Left: Phonsay, Under My Umbrella, Acrylic on Linen, 122 x 122cm.

Above Right: Phonsay, Bubblegum Dream , Acrylic on Linen, 122 x 122cm.

Phonsay‘s clever and whimsical digital photographic prints have long been a favourite among Thierry B clients, who are drawn in with his quirky compositions all expertly framed in this limited edition printed on super fine, museum-quality rag paper, offering an aquarelle stipled-like effect. This year sees Phonsay picking up his fine hair paint brushes to create some client commissions of portraits of families, and the odd surprise gift for a special birthday for hard to buy for loved ones. The paintings start from 122 x 122cm in size and can be commissioned to size with an emerging price tag to boot. An affordable way of adding a treasure to your growing collection.

Above: Michael Whitehead, Ever After, Synthetic Polymer Paint and Mixed Media on Linen, 80 x 270cm, Private Residence, Toorak.

Above: Thierry B, Pieces of You, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, Private Residence, Toorak.

Some of Thierry B’s satisfied clients:

“We are both so thankful for your decorating expertise for our home – from advice on paintings for our space, design recommendations and of course, your skillful hanging – it now looks amazing!”  –  Karen and Justin, Malvern.

“Hi Thierry – this is the quickest makeover ever. Thought I was in the wrong apartment. Looks brilliant. Love your work. Many thanks for your time today. Very much appreciated” – Julie & Michael, Southbank

Above Left: Thierry B, Unlimited Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm – Port Melbourne Residence.

Above Right: Thierry B, Between the Lines Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 137 x 122cm – Port Melbourne Residence.

Above Right: Thierry B, Calming Chaos, Synthetic Polymer Paint On Linen, 183 x 183cm – Williamstown Residence.

It is always appreciated when our valued clients take the time to express their gratitude: “Dear Thierry, I’m walking around my house in absolute awe with what you have created here with your style and flair, something that I would never have been able to achieve. Thank you so much for everything so far. I really appreciate you coming out this afternoon and fine tuning the furniture and putting up the family photos which are very important to me and you’ve made it look classy and elegant. I know it’s a busy time of year for everyone so I appreciate you fitting today into your schedules. I can’t wait to see the house in Belle magazine hopefully sometime in 2017 to show off your hard work for all to admire. You’re a true gem and a beautiful person! Justine xxxx” – John & Justine, Williamstown.

Thierry B Fine Art is located at 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra.

Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday, 11am – 5pm, Sunday 12pm-5pm or by appointment: 0404861438.

 

The Finkelstein Files: The Lyon Housemuseum

LHM-Architecture-06

The Housemuseum is the story of a partnership between collector and architect Corbett Lyon and his wife, Yueji Lyon, who began shaping their collection of Australian contemporary art over twenty six years ago. The collection was established with the intention of making works available for public viewing, and for research and education. The original Housemuseum is a unique combination of private residence and private museum where ‘museum’ and ‘living’ are brought together in a single building.

 
Above: Christopher Langton’s inflatable sculpture Swell, 2003, sits on a large circular plinth in the
centre of the southern garden concrete and can be viewed through the full height windows of the living room.

From modest beginnings in the late 1980’s , the Lyon Collection has grown to become one of the largest and most significant in the country, offering insights into Australian contemporary art practice from the early 1990’s  through the first two decades of the twenty first century. The Housemuseum was designed by Corbett Lyon, as both a family home and as a building which would allow works from the Collection to be displayed for public viewing. The Housemuseum represents a new an experimental architectural type – a hybrid of house and museum.

Today the Collection holds over 350 works from over 50 artists, representing one of the strongest collections of Australian contemporary art in the country. Following selected artists over the course of their evolving practices, the Collection includes works by internationally recognised Australian artists such as Brook Andrew, Howard Arkley, Patricia Piccinini, Callum Morton, Shaun Gladwell, Daniel von Sturmer and Daniel Crooks and represents many of the key moments and important shifts in Australian artistic practice and thinking.

Above (Right): Stephen Bram, Untitled, 2015, Acrylic on Linen, 278 x 210 cm.

At first glance, Stephen Bram‘s abstract paintings include forms of no recognisable shape splashed across the picture plane, bristling with jagged edges that run helter-skelter over a dark greyish underpainting.  These geometric blobs behave according to perspective and that they spell out the orthogonals of an architectural interior. The blobs at the bottom indicate a floor while the blobs at the top indicate a ceiling. Those to the side are walls. Each composition becomes a picture in spite of the initial appearance of random form. The flat forms with jagged edges behave according to perspective, introducing angles by means of their staggered outline. Their chaotic disposition is scaffolded onto a grid of two-point perspective, where twin vanishing points are situated out-of-frame to the left and the right. In the past, Bram used this rigorous system from the Renaissance to reconcile it with hard-edge abstraction. His works almost effortlessly married the Cartesian apparatus of space with the intellectual apparatus of its deconstruction in flat painting.

Above: Lyon also designed a hybrid pipe/digital organ for installation on the west wall of the music room.

This custom designed instrument combines ranks of real pipes with the digital recordings of actual pipe sounds from the great cathedral organs of Europe.

In the tradition of local collectors such as the Reeds and the Besens, who knew the artists they collected and set up museums for their art (Heide and Tarrawarra respectively), the Lyon family has followed its peer group. But the Lyon Housemuseum is different. The Lyons have opened their collection and home to the public. But the ”ultimate opportunity”, Lyon says, has been the ability to design the house as well, and create ”a new species of building. People have certain expectations on entering a public museum or walking through a large house,” says Lyon. ”We’ve shaken and stirred them, so they are more juxtaposed.” For Lyon, ”absurdly inserting museum spaces – white and black cubes – into a domestic interior, creates a powerful architectural experience”.

Above: Howard Arkley, Fabricated Rooms, 1997 -1999, Acrylic on Canvas, 17 panels, overall 203 x 1930cm.

Once the double-storey white cube is in the home, it’s attacked. Slicing through its white walls, the architects have inserted slot windows that allow views of more artworks, people in other rooms, and views outside the gallery. ”It’s about breaking free of the tyranny that the white cube brings with it,” says Lyon. ”It’s about involving you as the spectator in the whole spatial experience of the building. It’s the opposite of the typical museum where the effort is to cut you off from the outside in order to see the artwork in an almost sacred, timeless space – the temple or tomb where all great art goes to die,” says Lyon.

The building is also anchored by an artwork. Arkley’s massive 17-panel work Fabricated Rooms is on permanent display in the formal dining room above the white cube. Another marker is between the kitchen and the black box, a pipe organ Lyon designed (and plays) for concerts. Private rooms can be closed off as required. ”Shrink-wrapping” it is a huge zinc roof. ”The design strategy of hybridising those opposites – the house/museum, public/private architecture – finds its way into the form of the building,” says Lyon.

Above: Arts patron Yueji Lyon, warmly invites the public to view the the Housemuseum, home to her 20 & 22 year-old daughters, who both incidentally are studying architecture and live in ‘apartment’ pods upstairs.

”The gable-ended roof refers to a primitive form of a house, but it’s clad in black zinc that refers to the monumentality of public architecture.” One of the building’s greatest accomplishments in the public and private juxtaposition is the layering of words throughout the site. For instance, the corner property’s brick fence displays the Kew address in 2.5-metre-high brick letters: Cotham and Florence. Inside, across its ceilings, friends’ names, recipes and other personal notes are ”tattooed” into the timber, in shapes that spell out ”ART”. (see above) These are words and phrases collected cheekily by the four members of the Lyon family during the construction of the Housemuseum. They represent a form of family history at the time the building was completed. The texts include place names, significant people and events, biographical details, family recipes and other markers in the lives of the Housemuseum’s occupants.

Above: Christopher Langton, Cute (Doggy Style), 2011, PVC, polyester resin and acrylic, 198 x 91 x 60 cm approx.

Represented by Tolarno Galleries in Melbourne, Johannesburg-born sculptor, Christopher Langton is a pop sculptor and installation artist who creates plastic blow-up ‘toys’ of frightening proportions. Curator Mark Feary commented: ‘Langton’s work makes you feel good, but only sort of.’ Indeed there is something ominous about these sculptures despite their bright colours, smiling faces and fun media. They blend the playful naivety of Betty Boop and Astro Boy with the more knowing aesthetic palette of Roy Lichtenstein. Langton breathes plastic life into bobbing and bopping figures like a Geppeto gone mad!

Above: Brent Harris, Oceania, Oil on Linen, 179 x 279cm.

Brent Harris’ paintings and works on paper are brooding, dripping swamplands delineated in the most meticulous way.  Stark planes, often black and white, belie the swooping organic gestures and expressionist shapes. “Many of his forms vibrate, rise and fall, and cause the viewer’s eye much exercise in following them”, noted James Mollison in Art and Australia. But what surprises most is the sensuality of the work; as though the sharp lines and immaculate surfaces can barely contain the emotions brooding beneath.

painted on the base of his second Housemuseum of contemporary art in Kew. Photo: Josh Robenstone

It clearly is an expensive enterprise (”we don’t talk about how much”) and Lyon says the Housemuseum receives no funding or tax concessions. What’s the incentive? ”The really positive thing we get out of it is that people get the idea.They don’t feel like they’re coming to an institution. People say it’s changed the way they think about Melbourne. We wouldn’t do it if it didn’t have that kind of reaction.”

Designed around a two storey ‘white cube’ at the front of the building and a two storey ‘black cube’ at the rear, these act as anchors for the building and display paintings, sculpture, video work and installations. Family living areas flow around these two anchors, accommodating further artworks, architectural drawings and artefacts. Through this juxtaposition of art and living, the Housemuseum challenges conventional ideas of ‘public’ and ‘private’ and explores new relationships between art and the spaces in which it is viewed. Offering a new platform for works of contemporary art, architecture and design, the new Housemuseum galleries is a major expansion of the Lyon Housemuseum. Due to open mid 2018, the new galleries will provide a series of spaces for international and local exhibitions and events, where new ways of presenting and experiencing art will be explored.

And a hint as to why Lyon has just unveiled an Olympic swimming pool-sized artwork on the base of the yet-to-be built museum next door – painted blue, black, pink and mint green by Melbourne artist Reko Rennie – only to have it built over in a week’s time. Watch the minute-long time lapse video of Reko Rennie’s Visible Invisible, painted on the foundation of Corbett Lyon’s new Housemuseum in Kew.

Above: All images courtesy of John Gollings.

“As part of the announcement on Tuesday January 31 this year, a major new artwork, the size of an Olympic-sized swimming pool at 44 x 20 metres, was revealed. Australian contemporary artist Reko Rennie’s VISIBLE INVISIBLE (2017) spreads across the concrete base of the building, forming the foundation of the new galleries. Using 600 litres of Dulux paint to create, the artwork will be visible in its entirety for a short time, prior to being covered by the construction of the new museum. The artwork is visible from the street (as well as passing tram) for the coming weeks. A portion of the artwork will remain visible within the new museum, hinting at the colossal artwork lying hidden beneath.”

Reko Rennie explores his Aboriginal identity through contemporary media, provokes discussion surrounding Indigenous culture and identity in contemporary urban environments. Largely autobiographical, his commanding works combine the iconography of his Kamilaroi heritage with stylistic elements of graffiti. Merging traditional diamond-shaped designs, hand-drawn symbols and repetitive patterning, he works to subvert romantic ideologies of Aboriginal identity.

“Camouflage exploits the vulnerability of visual perception and its subjective relationship with meaning. It usually attempts to render the visible invisible by disorienting our eyes and employing the art of disguise. This work plays with layers of patterning, colour blending and contrasting areas of intensity and flatness in order to turn the tradition role of camouflage on its head. My use of camouflage aims to amplify, rather than conceal my identity, and to stake my claim to a luminous, commanding form of cultural visibility.”

Above: Emily Floyd, WORKSHOP (detail), 2012, steel, 2-part epoxy paint, ferrador, each letter approx. 150 x 150 x 40cm.

Set to be one of the largest dedicated contemporary art precincts in Melbourne, the new public art gallery will offer a new platform for works of contemporary art, architecture and design. Part of a major expansion of the Lyon Housemuseum and the result of a $14.5 million donation by the founding benefactors, the Lyon family, the gallery will provide a series of spaces for international and local exhibitions and events, where new ways of presenting and experiencing art will be explored.

Corbett Lyon commented, “We are very excited by plans for the new public gallery and its potential to foster experimentation, ideas and conversations across disciplines – between artists, architects, designers and the public to enrich and add to our city’s cultural life.” He continues, “… As we approach the opening of the new museum we are thinking widely in terms of ideas, exhibitions and events to add a rich dimension to the extraordinary cultural life we have here in Melbourne.”

The Finkelstein Files: Bonnes Vacances!

Thierry B Fine Art is open 11am – 5pm until Saturday 24th December! We have had a very busy few months welcoming clients into our new purpose-built gallery showroom in South Yarra. Now open across 7 days, our collection is accessible from 11am – 5pm or by appointment. As a note of gratitude to our loyal clientele, the gallery would like to extend an invitation to purchase paintings at a reduced price, to include custom framing, delivery and installation into your space for business of home.

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Michael Whitehead, Ever After, Synthetic Polymer Paint and Mixed Media on Linen, 80 x 270cm, Signed, Dated and Titled Verso.
fortitudePatricia Heaslip, Absinthe, Oil on Canvas, 137 x 137cm, Signed, Dated and Titled Verso.

 

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Thierry B, Tides Turning, Synthetic Polymer Paint On Italian Linen , 200 x 300 cm, Signed, Dated and Titled Verso.

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Patricia Heaslip, Diamond Soul, Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm, Signed, Dated and Titled Verso.

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Thierry B, Indulgence of Freedom, Synthetic Polymer Paint On Italian Linen , 200 x 300 cm, Signed, Dated and Titled Verso.
Foreground: Alan Annells, Kimberley Horizons Series, Cast silicon bronze and stainless steel, unique edition.

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Master painter, Thierry B. pictured in his Huntingdale studio.

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Thierry B, The Well Wisher, Synthetic Polymer Paint On Italian Linen , 200 X 300 cm, Signed and Dated Lower Right, Titled Verso.

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Thierry B Fine Art Gallery interior featuring 200 x 300cm paintings by Thierry B.

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Thierry B, Grounded, Synthetic Polymer paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, Signed and Dated Lower Right, Titled Verso.

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Thierry B, Relying On Each Other, Synthetic Polymer paint on Linen, 122 x 183cm, Signed and Dated Lower Right, Titled Verso

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Thierry B, Deep Ocean Horizon, Synthetic Polymer paint on Linen, 183 x 330cm, Signed and Dated Lower Right, Titled Verso.

Best wishes for a healthy and happy new year for all,

Vicki & Thierry xx

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The Finkelstein Files: Prodigious Paintings by Master Painter Thierry B

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Thierry B is well known for his colossal sized canvases – all abstract in style and resolutely zen in spirit. The three framed works featured in our South Yarra gallery measure 2 x 3 metres each. Happy to paint commissioned works for his clients, Thierry loves to bring colour, movement and energy into a room changing the feel forever into a space where you are at home.

Bigger indeed, can be better! If you have a space or multiple areas which have blank walls crying out for some special treatment, visit Thierry B Fine Art where we showcase larger paintings. We also offer a custom framing service, delivery and installation included in our pricing for a total turn-key solution for your home or business.

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Above: Master painter, Thierry B. in paint splattered overalls doing what he loves most – creating! Pictured here in his Huntingdale studio hard at work.

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Thierry B.
The Well Wisher
Synthetic Polymer Paint On Italian Linen
200 X 300 cm
Signed and Dated Lower Right
Titled Verso

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Thierry B.
Tides Turning
Synthetic Polymer Paint On Italian Linen
200 X 300 cm
Signed and Dated Lower Right
Titled Verso

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Thierry B.
Indulgence of Freedom
Synthetic Polymer Paint On Italian Linen
200 x 300 cm
Signed, Dated and Titled Verso

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Thierry B.
New Chapter
Synthetic Polymer Paint On Italian Linen
183 x 183 cm
Signed, Dated and Titled Verso

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Thierry B.
The Love Exchange
Synthetic Polymer Paint On Italian Linen
170 x 250 cm
Signed, Dated and Titled Verso

appointment

The gallery is open Monday – Saturday 11am – 5pm and Sunday 12pm – 5pm until Christmas Eve @ 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra.

For an appointment outside these hours, please call  0404 861 438 or email art@thierrybfineart.com.

Happy Holidays to all from me and mine – to a new year filled with health and happiness for all.

Vicki xx

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