The Finkelstein Files: The Art of the Fold

 

Welcome to the Duldig Studio, In East Malvern is the former home and studios of Karl and Slawa Duldig, which is now a museum of their impressive artwork including bronzes by Karl, a renowned modernist sculptor.

If unfamiliar with this veritable treasure trove of a house-museum, you must get acquainted; “the Duldig Studio offers visitors the experience of the working environment of a distinguished sculptor, and his wife, an equally talented and interesting artist. It gives an insight into the cultural life of Melbourne and Australia at a time of enormous change, politically and artistically. This is a profound lesson in the experience of migration transforming the life of the nation.” – Dr. Gerard Vaughan AM, Director of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

This extraordinary house-museum is a living, breathing testament to the care, love and memory which founding director and daughter of the artistic couple, Eva De Jong Duldig, first envisioned the space as a creative tribute to house her & her parents emerge memories, of a life lived well yesteryear, in Vienna, a century ago, in pre-war Europe.

Writers, Corrie Perkins and Penny Webb bothy waxed lyrical about the inherent charms which embrace the visitor upon entry into this unique creative environment providing : “an insight into an intimate approach to art that remains based on the lived experience...” exploring , “one of the city’s most engaging public galleries.”

Image: Founder and Patron of the Duldig Studio in Malvern East, Eva de Jong-Duldig pictured at the Brilliant Brolly fundraiser event, held Saturday evening, 7th April, 2019.

A decade ago saw the museum take their precious archival memorabilia into accreditation and subsequently have been recognised with a swag of well-deserved awards, testament to their volunteer and steerage committee and handful of dedicated part time staff who undertook this herculean task to create a solid platform to ensure the museums’ sustainability;

Winner 2018 Victorian Museums Archival Survival Award for Small Museums – Reaching Out to Our Communities – expanding public programs
Finalist 2016 National Museums and Galleries Awards
 Interpretation, Learning and Audience Engagement Award
Winner 2016 Victorian Community History Awards – Historical Interpretation Award
Highly Commended 2014 Victorian Community History Awards – Historical Interpretation Award.

img_5770

img_5740

The Brilliant Brolly Campaign is the Duldig Studio major initiative to raise funds to care for this nationally significant collection and to extend current outreach programs. The campaign is supported by Creative Partnerships Australia’s (CPA) Plus 1 matched funding program up to $20,000. To access this funding, the Studio have embarked on a fundraising campaign to raise $20,000 before 31 May 2019 as every dollar raised, Creative Partnerships Australia will match the amount.

A twilight launch for the event was held Saturday 7th April, 2019 which saw a slew of eager supporters, artists, board members, friends and family all gather under the umbrella provided by Mother Nature herself, who held court with a warmer than usual Melbourne evening to auction off the displayed umbrellas, generously gifted by Australian company, Clifton Umbrellas. This corporate service provider, has for 85 years held court and is today 100% owned by the original  family operated by the fourth generation of the family of the company founder, Clifton Joseph.

DULDIG_STUDIO_BRILLIANT_BROLLY_FUNDRAISER_070419_52.JPG

Sparkling wines , strawberries and smiles abounded as the Studio’s life-blood gathered in appreciation for the campaign’s initiative, the brainchild of board member, Janine Kibblewhite, pictured above, as deserving recipient of a prized tipple of bubbly.

Image: a sample of selected creative brolly on display in the rear sculpture garden of the Duldig Studios, courtesy of @thefinkelsteinfiles.

img_5785

Image: Founder, Eva de Jong-Duldig and director, Lyndel Wischer applaud the inaugural winner of the 2019 Brilliant Brolly competition.

Last month saw February 10 celebrate World Umbrella Day, an occasion not typically marked by raucous celebrations but one always remembered in Melbourne’s East. Inside the vestibule of the once family home, the ubiquitous ‘flirt’ umbrella, patented by its’ inventor, Slawa ( nee Horowitz) Duldig, an early prototype of an Austrian-invented folding, collapsible umbrella in 1928, in Vienna.

Her daughter, Eva recounted, that it was a drawing excursion on a rainy May day in 1928 when Slawa declared: “I armed myself with a big umbrella and muttered to myself: ‘Why on Earth must I carry this utterly clumsy thing? Can’t they invent a small folding umbrella which could be easily carried in a bag?” She home Slawa went and spent time coming up with her design. A prototype was built with parts from watchmakers, and she made sure not to buy too many parts from any one place. “She didn’t want anyone to cotton on that she was doing this umbrella thing,” Eva said.

Design drawings for a folding umbrella.

 

Slawa obtained a patent for her invention in 1928 and successfully licensed the design to manufacturers in Austria and Germany. Patents for folding, telescopic umbrellas date back to at least 1896 but Slawa’s improvements were elegant. She simplified the folding mechanism, allowing the whole umbrella to be smaller and more practical.

The umbrella went on the market with an unusual name. “The little umbrella was called Flirt, which was very with it,” Eva said, “It was still seen as quite a luxury item; it was beautifully finished and made out of nice materials.” The Flirt was featured at the 1931 Inventor’s Fair in Vienna, with the press describing it as “the magic umbrella of the sculptress”.

 

Slawa married Karl Duldig that same year and her business helped to fund their new life together. “She was able to furnish the whole house with this beautiful customised art furniture made by a very well-known firm in Vienna,” Eva said. Slawa gave birth to Eva on February 11, 1938, one month before the Nazis marched into Austria. The young family fled via Switzerland, but under pressure from the Nazis Slawa sold her rights to the umbrella to company Brüder Wüster. She was, however, able to evade the authorities and secretly put the umbrella prototypes into storage.

img_5710-1

img_5700

img_5706img_5703

DULDIG_STUDIO_BRILLIANT_BROLLY_FUNDRAISER_070419_53.JPG

Fast froward to a balmy afternoon which eloquently fades into twilight in time for the umbrellas to be auctioned off to the highest bidder. Much merriment and memories made as the event manages to seamlessly seague across multiple generations – just as Slawa would’ve wanted it.

 

VF signature copy.jpg

B&W TFF.jpg

Advertisements

The Finkelstein Files: Beyond The Woods

If trees are carriers of symbolic possibilities, the exhibition Beyond the Trees is a powerful and poetic response to our emotive connections to our planet. Climate change, the environment and the preservation of diversity are ‘hot’ topics. The life sustaining essence of trees is explored deftly by Victor Majzner who eschews these living monuments ideals of endurance and longevity. Often emblematic of patience and wisdom, dozens of canvases stand like proud sentinels along the gallery walls of the light-drenched Langford 120 in North Melbourne.

vic-Looking into myself, after Felix N 2013 Acrylic on canvas 92 x 92 cm

Beyond the Woods sign-posts a sharp twist in the tale of this image-maker of ideas of the Divine. An innate colourist, Majzner’s narratives intrigue and are full of pathos. Screams at the world mingle with recurring  faces reiterating a human helplessness –  a search for salvation? Many questions are raised without resolution as the trees sit expectantly, quietly on the walls – contemplating and confronting. Looking Into Myself, after Felix N, 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 92 x 92 cm (above).

vic-Portal to memory, after Ezra K 2013 Acrylic on canvas 92 x 92 cm

Portal to Memory, After Ezra K, 2013, 92 x 92cm (above), reflects two strong entertwined trees in a puddle of water – brothers who are emotionally connected or lovers? The connection is powerful and strong, a reflection as a symbolic portal to a memory from the past. A thought bubble hovers offering comfort, that these two souls are still looking after each other.

Vic-2 Vic-1

Much of Majzners’ writings on his work are encapsulated in an insanely beautiful box-set featuring a complete catalogue of works and an additional visual diary filled with studio insights and authored offerings on his mid-career trajectory. Designed by the artist’s equally talented son, Andrew of Paper, Stone, Scissors fame, its clear the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree!

vic-Strange fruit 2013 Acrylic on canvas 92 x 92 cm

The above image lends its’ title from one of the most moving of Billie Holiday’s songs, Strange Fruit.  The gigantic tree, a universe of life has from time to time become the conduit for violence, racism and death. Sanctified by manmade laws and attitudes of power where the humanity of ‘the other’ has been degraded to a possession, only to be disposed of at the racist whim of the plantation master of the KKK gang in the American South up to the 60’s.

vic-Sky_night tree, after Alex S 2012 Acrylic on canvas 152 x 137 cm

Victor explains that Alex Skovron’s poem The Sky Tree was the starting inspiration for this painting, “Memories of fairy tales from my childhood, of dark forests where miraculous adventures took place were other inspirational sources. Out of darkness /’nothing’/chaos energy swarms into a vortex that eventually forms into branches of a tree, like lightening rods of light coming down to ‘earth’ with lights at each braces’ extremity, illuminating / suggesting a spiritual dimension as its source. Through the branches, at night can be seen small villages with their distinguished church spires. These villages are separated by dark forests and by meandering country roads and lanes illuminated by ‘golden’ lights – magic pervades.”

vic-st-4

The roots of tradition and story-telling are embedded firmly into Majzner’s earth and the longer you spend gazing around the collection, the tighter the grip becomes. As he shows me around ‘the cage’ studio (above) – two days after a first viewing, these images resonate still, in my minds’ eye. Each with a story to tell and a potential lesson to unfurl.

The Finkelstein Files: Art Appreciation 101

Why does art matter?? For without perspective, life would be awfully dull!  It is our most expressive form of sharing. Art matters because it illustrates the human experience—the wonder of it, the bewilderment of it, the whimsy of it, and so much more. We would not be connected so deeply without the existence of art

The arts matter because they help us see the world from different perspectives. They give us empathy and help us understand people, places, periods of history, and issues with which we may otherwise be unfamiliar. They comfort us in grief and energise us in celebration. They are important because they can act as a catalyst for change…they can start a revolution! The arts ignite something in our brains that I can’t explain, but I know it’s essential for life.


Above: Artwork by painter Michael Whitehead, Document, 2018, Mixed Media on Linen, 150 x 200cm. Interior styling courtesy of Melissa Gries of Zenza Interiors.

Are you a newbie to the art of collecting? Here is a substantial reason how you can start your very own art collection! Post October this year, if you have a registered ABN for a business which is turning over under $10million annually, an art work upto $20,000 will be fully tax deductible under current ATO regulations.

So effectively, you could purchase 5 x paintings at $20,000 each & have something to show for $100,000 taxable amount owing. No better time to invest in an art collection! Read more HERE by arts accountant specialist & valuer, Michael Fox regarding the recent ATO updates.

Above: Artwork by painter Michael Whitehead, Manuscript, 2018, Mixed Media on Linen, 180 x 210cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by painter Michael Whitehead, H, 2018, Mixed Media on Linen, 180 x 210cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com


Above: Artwork by Patricia Heaslip, Walk In Silence, Oil on Canvas, 122 x 122cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

 

Above: Artwork by Thierry B., Nuanced, 2018 – Dreamscape series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 122 x 183cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com


Above: Artwork by Thierry B., Fairytale, 2018 Dreamscape Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

 

Above: Artwork by Wilson LinThe Things We Do For Love, Fractal Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 183 x 274.5cm (triptych). Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Wilson LinFresh Strike, 2018, Fractal Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 170 x 250cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

 

Above: Artwork by Thierry B., Mindful Moments, 2018 Dreamscape Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

 

Above: Artwork by Patricia Heaslip, Landlines, Oil on Linen, 183 X 183cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com


Above: Artwork by Thierry B., Entanglement, 2018 Coral Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

 

Above: Artwork by Thierry B.,Voyage, 2018,Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Thierry B.,The Deep Blue, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Thierry B.Starling Zen-sation, 2016,Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

If you have a registered ABN for a business which is turning over under $10million annually, an art work upto $20,000 will be fully tax deductible under current ATO regulations. So effectively, you could purchase 5 x paintings at $20,000 each & have something to show for $100,000 taxable amount owing. No better time to invest in an art collection! Read more HERE by arts accountant specialist & valuer, Michael Fox regarding the recent ATO updates.

The Thierry B Fine Art website offers a complete stockroom to view available works, interior pages with the paintings installed into their new homes for inspiration, in addition to a testimonial page which sounds positively smarmy – every word is true!!! We look forward to welcoming you into our bespoke gallery space, complete with oversize stockroom for your viewing pleasure.

Thierry B Fine Art  is located @ 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra. Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday 11am – 5pm & Sunday 12pm – 5pm or by appointment via art@thierrybfineart.com

17795710_1199654590133758_8475268264116597575_n

The Finkelstein Files: Y-ello? Is it Me You’re Looking For??

Finally the layers come off, our winter coats are swapped for lighter moments of turning our faces toward the sun again and soaking up all that luminous sunshine, blue skies, chirping birdies and the scent of flowers and bees busily humming. Not a moment too soon either, as Melbournians, we are well within our right to celebrate the joy that spring brings when it has indeed sprung!!

So too, new arrivals of sparkling and just-dried varnished art works jostle for position in our 500+ strong painting filled bespoke stock room. Wilson Lin has delivered a new fractal series, as has Phonsay, with some knock-your-socks-off hyper-realist paintings. Master painter, Thierry B. has been installing freshly framed creations onto the gallery walls for art collectors to snap up for their spaces at home or surround themselves with inspiring paintings whilst at work.



Above: Wilson Lin, The Things We Do For Love, Fractal Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 274.5cm, P.O.A


Above: Wilson Lin, Fresh Strike, Fractal series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 170 x 250cm, P.O.A


Above: Artist, Wilson Lin painting in his studio in Melbourne, 2018.


Above: Thierry B., Voyage, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, P.O.A

 

Above: Thierry B., The Deep Blue, Coral Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A

 

Above: Abstract Expressionist artist Thierry B., pictured in his gallery with painting, Zensation, 2017, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A

 

How many Abstract painters can confidently say, their oeuvre encompasses twenty-seven (27!!) different styles available to his clientele?! So much of Thierry B’s art can be traced and talked about in terms of intention. The use of repetition in mark making, draws the viewer into the picture plane. It can be seen as metaphor for making his mark upon the world on a physical scale. Lyrical and delicate imagery, these fluid shapes transform spaces they inhabit. Hypnotic and healing, many of  Thierry B’s series have been widely collected and photographed in private collections across Australia and overseas.

 

Above: Thierry B Fine Art represents some of Australia’s best-loved Abstract artists as they explore and celebrate colour, layers of texture texture & movement.

 

Above: Thierry B., A Fine Romance, Dreamscape Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

 

Above: Thierry B., Tenderness, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

 

Above: Thierry B., La Vie En Rose, Euphoria Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

 

Thierry B explains the art of zen; “My work is all about introducing the joy of colour into our lives, often seen here through cross-sections which challenge your spatial perception. The vibrancy of hue and curvilinear forms in repetition create a dynamic feast for the eye, where they are in constant motion. Energy maps a pathway for our eyes and hearts to meld.” – Thierry B, July 2018.

 

Above: Hyper-realism artist, Phonsay painting in his Albury-based studio.

 

Above: Phonsay, Desert Storm, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 91.5 x 122cm, P.O.A. Framed in 18 carat white-gold water-gilding with ornate white custom-made frame.

 

If you have a registered ABN for a business which is turning over under $10million annually, an art work upto $20,000 will be fully tax deductible under current ATO regulations.

The Thierry B Fine Art website offers a complete stockroom to view available works, interior pages with the paintings installed into their new homes for inspiration, in addition to a testimonial page which sounds positively smarmy – every word is true!!! We look forward to welcoming you into our bespoke gallery space, complete with oversize stockroom for your viewing pleasure.

The gallery is located @ 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra. Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday 11am – 5pm & Sunday 12pm – 5pm or by appointment.

The Finkelstein Files: The Fine Art of Investment!

Wondering how to maximise your tax return for your business and feel like you’ve come out somehow on top?! With Australia’s tax breaks available to businesses which turnover under $10 million annually, owning your own art collection has never been so simple.

Michael Fox, a leading Melbourne tax accountant specialising in the arts explains, “The rules changed about two years ago regarding buying art for your business,” explains Michael Fox. “Today in Australia it is much easier to gain tax breaks for buying works of under $20,000 than it ever was before,” he says. Fox who helps people with their tax every day says one of the big loopholes people can exploit, is the “Turnbull’s Tradies” – a Small Business raft of tax measures, which allows small businesses to claim their expenses up to $20,000. “If you have an ABN, then under the small business act you can claim the entire sum of that purchase up to the tune of $20,000 each; A small business meaning turnover of less than $10 million dollars annually.

“This rule means you can buy as many individual art works as you like worth just under $20,000 each and claim them as a legitimate business expense. For example if you wanted you could buy five artworks for $19,990 each and claim a tax write-off of close to $100,000 by buying those 5 works. “I don’t think the government really intended it to be a tax break for the arts industry. At the time it was introduced so that tradespeople could claim the expense of a utility vehicle. “It is not that widely understood,” Fox says.

 

Above: Painting by Wilson Lin, Spatiality, 2017, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, $ 5,500. Sculpture by Jane Valentine, Harmonic Lines III, 2007, Marble on Granite base, 48 (dia) x 25 (d) x 90(h) cm, P.O.A

 

Above: Wilson Lin working on his Fractal series in studio, Melbourne, Australia.

 


Above: Wilson Lin, A Glimmering Sheet, 2018, Fractal series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, $5,500

 

Thierry B Fine Art showcases the Abstract paintings and sculpture from over a dozen Australian artists. Master painter and designer, Thierry B, will also scope your home or business space and recommend the ideal proportions. The South Yarra-based state-of-the-art gallery, Thierry B Fine Art provides a turn-key solution for our valued clients – where guesswork has been eliminated for you.

With prices starting from $2,500 upto $55,000, paintings are given the royal treatment proudly sporting a custom-made frame, complimentary nation-wide delivery & installation.

Above: Master Abstract Expressionist painter Thierry B. pictured in his Huntingdale studio, Melbourne, Australia.

 

Above: Thierry B., Contrast, 2017, Groove Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 183cm, Corporate collection, Craigieburn Victoria.


Above: Patricia Heaslip, Landlines, 2015, Oil on Linen, 183 x 183cm, $15,000

 

Above: Michelle Breton, Trompette au Soleil, 2017, Mixed Media on Canvas, 153 x 137cm, $9,900

 

Gallery Manager and art curator, Vicki Finkelstein explains, “that while some people might be intimidated by going to a gallery and asking prices, new collectors should never be scared to talk about the budget they have in mind for buying art. “We can guide people to incredibly collectible museum quality work for under $20,000. We often work to very tight briefs for offices, homes and new collectors. Interior designers and architects for example will always come to us with a budget in mind, so we’re accustomed to taking clients through our stockroom to find the right work,” Finkelstein says.

 

Above: Thierry B. Dreamscape Series, Suddenly Clare, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 300cm, custom-framed in water-gilded, 18-carat gold, P.O.A

 

Above: Thierry B. La Vie En Rose, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, custom-framed in water-gilded, 18-carat gold, $15,000

 

Are you developing a corporate culture in your business? Are you running a business in a cut throat industry? Wanting to attract great clients and retain incredible staff? Then buy art. Not only will you claim the expense of making your office look cool, but if you are in charge, at the top end of town, you can curate a serious corporate collection.

Once you amass a cool art collection you can tour the work or open it to the public. At the top end of town the ultimate, is when these companies appoint someone as a curator and actually put together a decent collection. Then those sorts of exhibitions can go touring around the country. Granted with the name of the company attached, but still, it’s a form or a good will and very clever marketing.

 

Above: Richard Lewer, Untitled #27 (Tax Time Again), 2016, Langridge pigmented ink on sandpaper, 28cm by 23cm. Collection of Michael Fox Arts Accountant & Valuer.

Overseas this is common practice. Here in Australia companies like Wesfarmers, BresicWhitney, Allens and SBS all have great corporate collections the public can visit. Collecting art for your company isn’t just about tax savings or marketing. There have been several studies that show people who work in environments with nice artwork tend to be more productive.

Resident Curator at Allens Linklaters Maria Poulos can concur. Their collection was formed under the direction of Hugh Jamieson, a former partner at Allens, who left a legacy of 900 modern paintings. When he retired in 1995 he left behind a collection that has become central to the company’s vision and values, a collection that has continued to expand.

“The Collection represents an important part of Allens’ corporate identity and its connection to a much wider cultural world. In another sense, it’s a sign of good citizenship and creates a ‘civilised workplace’,” Poulos explains.

 


Above: Painting by Tim Blashki, Container/Contained, 2013, Acrylic on Board, 100 x 540cm, $20,000. Sculpture by Jane Valentine, Shielding II, 2014, Stauario Marble on granite base, 100 (h) x 90 (w) x 25 (d)cm, P.O.A

Above: Sculpture by Jane Valentine, Shielding II, 2014, Stauario Marble on granite base, 100 (h) x 90 (w) x 25 (d)cm, P.O.A

 

Today, corporate collections are generally no longer seen simply as a way of decorating a company’s foyer, boardroom or offices. Instead, they are seen as a marketing tool that assists in defining a corporation’s brand or reputation. Many of the organisations that focus on collecting contemporary art are in competitive industries where it is necessary to project an image of being a forward thinking, dynamic and progressive market leader in order to attract the best staff and clients.

Above: Michael Whitehead, diptych, Outcrop & Plateau, 2018, Mixed Media on Linen, 180 x 140cm, Corporate collection, South Yarra, Australia.

 

Shannan Whitney who is the CEO and Founder of BresicWhitney has watched his corporate collection grow considerably since he purchased a Bill Henson for his office back in 2003. “Art was introduced consciously quite early on. It was an important mechanism to connect customers with our brand within a physical space. It was also a nice connection piece for our staff,” Whitney says. Today he points out, that in all four of his offices, art plays a strong, but silent role.

“Firstly it’s unexpected which is great. Secondly like all art is supposed to do, it prompts a response and reaction, which is valuable and finally I think it has been an effective in helping people connect our brand with our vision,” he says. Maria Poulos echoes this sentiment at Allens, sighting the impact on staff as ‘positive’. “Lawyers often comment on the art as a great conversation starter with new clients – a handy way to break the ice. Even if someone remarks unfavourably, ‘How can you put up with that?’, art has stimulated discussion and a different way of looking at things,” she says.


Thierry B Fine Art is located at 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra.

Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday, 11am – 5pm, Sunday 12pm-5pm or by appointment: 0404861438.

 

The Finkelstein Files: The Art of Michelle Breton


Above: Michelle Breton, Honey Dreaming, 2017, Mixed Media on Italian Canvas, 153 x 137cm, P.O.A



Above: Michelle Breton, Trompette au Soleil, 2017, Mixed Media on Italian Canvas, 153 x 137cm, P.O.A

Michelle Breton’s ouevre relates to deep inward feelings rather than appealing to the intellect –  a visceral expression of motifs. Organic is form and matter, the works are resolved instinctively and intuitively. Filled with movement and chaos and control, Breton is a master of the abstract landscape.
“There comes a point in the painting when it reveals itself to me, and it’s at that moment I seem to know what it wants to be and what I need to do. Before that I’m it’s slave, making marks, throwing paint and even sometimes  eliminating everything,then taking stock of what has occurred and launching back in to it, allowing anything to happen. This process can take days, weeks or even months. We work together then it releases, I let go and voila! It’s a relationship that can be tumultuous at times, but it’s a dance that I never tire of, it is my joy and I couldn’t live without it, it’s my passion and my love.”
Thierry B has a strong relationship with artist Michelle Breton, showcasing her paintings for the past decade, both in High St, Prahran and now in the our purpose-built space at 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra. We have just received a new collection of canvases into the stockroom which are available to view.

Above: Michelle Breton, Last Kiss, 2018, Mixed Media on Italian Canvas, 183 x 152cm, P.O.A

Above: Michelle Breton, Chant Du Midi, 2017, Mixed Media on Italian Canvas, 152 x 137cm, P.O.A

Above: Michelle Breton, Letang St.Hubert, 2018Mixed Media on Italian Canvas, 183 x 152cm, P.O.A

 

Thierry B Fine Art offers turn-key solutions for all your art work needs. On-site consultations to scope the space with Thierry B’s expert eye recommending ideal proportions to ensure the paintings create the ‘wow factor’ you are seeking. Adding dynamic and colour-laden paintings into your spaces create a sense of authenticity, energy and harmony making your house a home you adore spending time relaxing in with family and friends.

In addition, we offer complimentary in-situ viewing of art work to ensure you feel comfortable with your decision when selecting your painting. As an additional thanks you and genuine gratitude for your business, Thierry B Fine Art will custom frame your art work, deliver and instal the works so they are looking their absolute best – with our compliments.


Above: Artist Michelle Breton, Flute’s Delight, 2017Mixed Media on Italian Canvas, 152 x 137cm, P.O.A

 

Above: Michelle Breton, Rising Candy, 2017Mixed Media on Italian Canvas, 183 x 152cm, P.O.A

Above: Artist Michelle Breton, Coral Earth, 2017Mixed Media on Italian Canvas, 152 x 183cm, P.O.A

 

The paintings are currently available at Thierry B Fine Art, 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra.

Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday 11am – 5pm, Sunday 12pm – 5pm or by appointment.

Call: +613 9827-7756 or 0404-861-438

ENQUIRE NOW

Vicki xx

IMG_1753

The Finkelstein Files: Looking Through Rose-Coloured Glasses



Above: Thierry B. , Entirety, Dreamscape Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

Above: Thierry B. , Suddenly Clare, 2016, Dreamscape Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 200 x 300cm, P.O.A


Above: Thierry B, La Vie En Rose, 2018, Euphoria Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

Above: Art patron admiring the work by Irish-American artist, Sean Scully, Red Chamber, 2012, Oil on Linen 279.4 x 335.3cm Image: courtesy of artist & exhibition “Facing East”, 2017, @ Multimedia Art Museum, Moscow, Russia.

There are days I yearn for rose-coloured glasses to create a softened vision of the world around me. For me, the color pink represents caring, compassion and love. If the pink color stands for unconditional love and understanding, and is also associated with giving and receiving care.

Since pink is a combination of red and white, both colors add a little to its characteristics. It gets the lust for action from the red color, and the white color gives it an opportunity to achieve success and insight. Passion and power from the color red, softened with the purity and openness of the white color completes pink color meaning. The deeper the pink color, the more passion and energy it radiates.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Street, Dresden, 1908, Oil on Canvas, 150 x 198cm. Image: Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA.

In more recent times, pink continues to be seized upon by artists keen to confound our expectations of what notes or message the floral pigment can confidently carry. Having established a formidable reputation in the middle of the 20th Century as a first-generation Abstract Expressionist, eschewing figurative subjects entirely in the 1950s, Canadian-born American artist Philip Guston reached for pink in a dramatic turn back to representational art in the late 1960s.

 Above: Philip Guston, The Studio, 1969, Oil on Canvas, 180.3 x 186.1cm, Private Collection.

By then, the colour itself had undergone something of a commercial transformation in American retail culture, having begun the century as a shade more often associated with boys and masculinity than fairy princesses and little girls’ dolls. But by the time Guston began introducing a menacing cast of Ku Klux Klan-inspired cartoon goons, whose implausibly pale pink stubby hoods continue to menace popular imagination to this day, the colour had been re-commodified as delicate and feminine. Grabbing pink by the scruff for his unsettling scenes of a seedy Americana, Guston slaps Barbie across the chops.

At the same moment that Guston’s provocative pink was poking the art world in the eye, scientific studies were underway by Alexander Schauss, Director of the American Institute for Biosocial Research, to determine whether manipulations of the colour could help control the behaviour of subjects surrounded by it. The result of Schauss’s investigation was the concoction of the psychologically subtle shade now known as “Baker-Miller Pink”, after the Naval correctional institute in Seattle, Washington where the pigment was successfully tested on the walls of inmates’ cells and credited with a significant calming of aggressive urges.

Above: Michelle Breton, Eclipse Telegraph 23, Acrylic & Mixed Media on Italian Canvas, 183 x 152cm, P.O.A


Above: Michelle Breton, Honey Dreaming, Acrylic & Mixed Media On Canvas, 153 x 137cm, P.O.A

Above: Thierry B., On The Rise, Wonderous Metamorphosis Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 183cm, Private Residence, Toorak.

Yet despite its ability to inspire docility, pink is still picking fights, challenging our perceptions to an aesthetic duel. Upon learning that the British artist Anish Kapoor had signed a contract giving him exclusive rights to a recently engineered colour known as Vantablack (the darkest shade ever devised), and the legal right to prohibit other artists from doing so, Kapoor’s younger contemporary Stuart Semple saw red.

Emboldened by Kapoor’s black embargo, Semple began concocting a supremely-fluorescent pink paint he contends is the “pinkest pink” ever contemplated (“no one has ever seen a pinker pink”, he insists). As a poke in the eye of Kapoor, Semple has made his colour available at a small price to anyone in the world so long as they confirm that they are not Anish Kapoor nor friendly enough with Kapoor to share it with him. En garde, Kapoor. You’ve been pink’d!

Thierry B Fine Art is located @ 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra.

Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday 11am – 5pm & Sunday 12pm – 5pm or by appointment on 0404 861 438.

Vicki Finkelstein, Gallery Manager, Thierry B Fine Art.