The Finkelstein Files: The Art of the Sell



Abstract Expressionist painter, Thierry B, in his Huntingdale studio, Summer 2018.

Thierry B, Everlast, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, P.O.A

Thierry B, Embers Alight, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, P.O.A

Welcome to 2018 – the year of expansion always, in all ways! If 2017, was all about completing cycles – then 2018 is all about starting afresh from a position of strength. Passion, hard work, commitment and an obvious love for what we do best – makes us one of the busiest commercial art galleries in Melbourne, if not Australia.

With the news that stalwart, and second generation dealer, Rob Gould has finally closed shop mid December 2017, leaving many artists in freefall. With disenfranchised vendors & creditors owed substantial amounts of money by Mossgreen auction houses, who is left no longer in the red??? Countless galleries have closed their doors –  leaving artists wondering if this is the final death knell of the gallery model which has existed for so many decades.

We are proud to report that our gallery continues to flourish and grow incrementally every quarter. We measure our success with sales, particularly repeat sales – where our customers trust us to assist them in the process of connecting and acquiring new works for their growing collections. The middle market is far from dead, or sluggish – ask us how many paintings we have sold in the past 2 weeks since we re-opened and we will need both hands! Testament to our success is these repeat clients who are more than happy to refer their family and closest friends ÷to a service which remains unrivalled by any other gallery in town.


Thierry B, Euphoria Series – Blanc, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

Thierry B’s loyal clientele, return with new briefs for their home, work & holiday spaces – ready to once again experience the Thierry B effect he is famous for. If you have yet to have Thierry B wave his magic in your direction, I suggest you take his complimentary consultation to have him review and recommend what will work well for your space.

Scoping a space provides the client with invaluable information from an expert eye which will inform and impact your space – acting as an anchor. Many clients make the mistake of erring on the side of caution, often selecting a painting which is too small to create the wow factor they are looking for. His turn-key solution includes custom framing, delivery and installation to exhibit your newly acquired painting in its best possible light.

Gifting a frame for the art work is our way of expressing our gratitude for giving us your business – with the painting installed and professionally finished, in its pride of place. Communication is a key element in the success of Thierry B Fine Art. It is tantamount that the client establishes and defines resonance with a painting from the get-go. Intuition is encouraged in the process – as the ‘love at first sight’ connection often rings true!

 

Thierry B, Mink, 2017, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, P.O.A

 

Thierry B explains the art of zen; “My work is all about introducing the joy of colour into our lives, often seen here through cross-sections which challenge your spatial perception. The vibrancy of hue and curvilinear forms in repetition create a dynamic feast for the eye, where they are in constant motion. Energy maps a pathway for our eyes and hearts to meld.” – Abstract Expressionist painter, Thierry B.

 


Thierry B, Relying on Each Other, 2017, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 183cm, P.O.A

Thierry B, Summer Escape, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

Thierry B, Etheric Exposure, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

 

I am eternally an optimist as is Thierry B – how many Abstract painters can confidently say, their oeuvre encompasses 17 different styles available to his clientele?! So much of his abstract art can be traced and talked about in terms of intention. The use of repetition in mark making, draws the viewer into the picture plane. It may be seen as metaphor for making his mark upon the world on a physical scale. Lyrical and delicate imagery, these fluid shapes transform spaces they inhabit. Hypnotic and healing, many of  Thierry B’s series have been widely collected and photographed in private collections across Australia and overseas.

Thierry B Fine Art website offers a stockroom to view, interiorpages with the paintings installed into their new homes, in addition to a testimonial page which sounds positively smarmy – every word is true!!! We look forward to welcoming you into our bespoke gallery space, complete with oversize stockroom for your viewing pleasure.

The gallery is located @ 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra & open Monday – Saturday 11am – 5pm & Sunday 12pm – 5pm or by appointment.

Vicki xx

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The Finkelstein Files: Thresholds of Perception

Melbournian artist Camille Hannah wants to challenge you. She wants to make you wonder about the contrasts between painting, photography and sculpture, and blur the lines between tradition and modernity. Hannah works on perspex, painting luscious strokes of oils onto the back of convex domed circles, using handmade brushes – a skill she picked up during an artist residency in China. Her palettes are moody and sumptuous, the rich colours reminiscent of a Caravaggio.

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Hannah’s works are 3-dimensional and painted on convex supports. As a material object they embody a spatiality that also challenges the distinction between painting and photography, painting and sculpture. As with her previous work, scale probes the limits of the visible with baroque play and the viewer must penetrate a space that represents the body- a foreign body – in order to see the image within.

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If painting circular pictures is problematic, spare a thought for artists who attempt to also paint on convex glass or perspex. It’s a punishingly tricky prospect, and so it’s doubly amazing that  oil on convex Perspex abstracts – manages to pull it off. In essence, Hannah’s final paintings are evidence of the reverse of her process, the gestural paint strokes, details and other ‘foreground’ features are the first laid down, while the backgrounds and other effects are the last.

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Her works aim to address the viewer at the threshold of vision and touch. As seeing relies on a plurality of sense organs, there is a visual correlation that compels perception to fleetingly pass through the sense of touch. This discrepancy between visual and tactile perception becomes a frontier area of sensation. There is a bodily presence in a wavering relation of moving outward and drawing back, identification and distancing. By inciting the viewer to move – the visual field of the works aim to be the space that envelops the viewer.

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Where space comes forward: the threshold of two and three dimensional representation of the flat image and the image-in-space and the concomitant compulsion to incorporate becomes an easily – crossed threshold of perception – an opening toward a dialectic between the interior and exterior, and the centre and its edges. These paintings are labyrinthine: the folds and curves aim to engage the body at the threshold of seduction and recoil, an interactivity that can never be construed on the basis of stillness. In this respect they strive to hold the viewer in a temporality by way of a ‘spatial stickiness’.

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Michel Lawrence from Inside Art interviews Camille Hannah about her work and practice here

See Camille’s AUSiMED artwork here.

august 2015

The Finkelstein Files: The Sublime Ms.Shaw

Artist Kate Shaw has an enduring fascination with interplanetary colonisation and what it might mean. Through a series of vibrant, psychedelic landscapes, she suggests these yearnings are a complicated combination of hope for new beginnings and a sense of hopelessness about a planet we seem certain we’ll lose.

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“My practice re-interprets notions of what constitutes landscape painting, both within an art historical context and a contemporary social context. The paintings deal with the tensions and dichotomies in both the depiction of the natural world and our relationship with it. I am currently exploring the sublime in nature whilst imbuing a sense of toxicity and artificiality in this depiction. The intention is to reflect upon the contradiction between our inherent connection to the natural world and continual distancing from it. My paintings aim to convey ideas of nature, alchemy and creation by operating on one level as a landscape another as abstraction.”

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In Kate Shaw’s work what we see, and what in fact are facing, are two distinctly different things. A viewer may immediately recognise a glacier, an alpine ridge, a snow-capped mountain, but we are equally witnessing a montage of abstract chemical reactions.

In a Rorsach test a patient is gently encouraged to make sense out of abstractions, to see a rabbit in a black and white ink-blot. In experimental pursuits in the 1960s patients were administered a healthy dose of LSD to respond to these monochromatic abstractions. It’s not hard to imagine the poten- tial hallucinogenic blast of such a process. The Surrealists were also enamoured of such shifting notions of reality, utilising their technique of ‘de- calcomania’ in order to find subconscious form in abstract materials.

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Shaw’s work has a similar interaction with the viewer, the patterns we recognise through her deft manipulation of coloured chemicals leads us into a world we immediately recognise, even if that world is pure fantasy.

This realm of signs becoming synonymous with what may be dubbed the ‘real world’ was best ar- ticulated by Roland Barthes in his exploration of semiotics. Signs and perception become blurred, the same way a swoosh on a sneaker now clearly reads as the word Nike. In Shaw’s work the notion of ‘landscape as product’, as an inevitably read sign amidst abstraction, blurs reality.

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What makes adroit patrons think Kate Shaw’s works are worth acquiring? That’s in the eye of each beholder, but I’m enthused because her paintings, and now videos, signify the spirit of the emerging Earth observations (EO) movement, where space imaging and sensing technologies are ubiquitously deployed to monitor and manage environments. (The goal of climate scientists is to build a global ‘autopiloting’ system to answer Buckminster Fuller’s 1968 call for ‘an operating manual for Spaceship Earth’.)

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See Kate’s AUSiMED art work here

august 2015